Jaguar I-Pace charging on 350 kW fast charger



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26 Replies to “Jaguar I-Pace charging on 350 kW fast charger”

  1. Patrick McSwain

    Yes, the last 1% of the SoC is variable. Sometimes fast, sometimes slow. I believe this might be the BMS checking the balance, and if it needs it, it automatically going into balance mode at 99%. However, at 100% charge the I-Pace has ~20% of it's regen available. So there is perhaps buffer on the top, which explains the high kW rate at high SoC, because 100% is probably 102% or higher. Per TOPIx, when the I-Pace says 0% SoC, the dealer tool reports 2%, so there is a bottom buffer too. And you have access to the highest regen levels (140kW?) starting at about 93-91% SoC. There is a green line that tells you the limit. So charging past 91% might help, but you will be using some friction braking unless you are more gentle. Can't wait for the 100kW+ 15.2 firmware update, but right now, it's not so bad. Jaguar's docs and software when it comes to charging are still in flux and not so great. The website says 100kW, but it's really capped at about 84kW on a 350kW watercooled charger in the USA.

  2. MiccaPhone

    What is the value on the y-axis at 13:30? It is "km/h" somehow??? What does it mean? I know it is somehow the first diagram "adjusted" by consumption at 90 km/h(?), but what math exactly is behind? Is it the value of 1st diagram divided e.g. by 0.2 if consumption is 0.2 kWh/100km?

  3. Gregor T

    Good Video!
    I hope you can repeat the test in a couple of weeks with the new Software in the I-Pace.
    As I heard yesterday from JAGUAR, the 200A Limit does no more exists in actual Software. 🙂

  4. Douglas Hamner

    The I-pace only uses 80% of available battery cell capacity. So even at 100%, the battery is actually at 80%. This is per my training materials. This is a buffer for the battery management system. That is why you get maximum charging current at all times, unlike the slow taper like the Tesla. Time will tell how long the battery lasts compared to Tesla's battery management system, but even Tesla suggests you do not exceed 80% state of charge on a regular basis. The reason why you don't hear the fan as much as the Tesla is the nature of the I-pace battery cooling system. It uses both a liquid cooling pump using a Glycol based coolant, and a R1234yjf refrigerant shared with the A/C. This spreads the battery cooling over two radiators (The A/C condenser and Coolant radiator) therefor minimizing fan duty cycle. It also uses the heat from the electric motors transferred to the coolant to keep the battery warm during the winter, maximizing range. The Inverter is capable of 200A, but limited due to software, but it has over the air updates just like Tesla. Once more real world testing and the the coding is complete I see the I-pace having maximum charging speed in the future.

  5. Foersom

    Great video with practical use of CCS HPC station.

    Most EVs (e.g. BMW I3, Renault Zoe, Tesla S 100) have 96 Li-Ion cells in series = nominal 350.4 – 355.2 V (cell 3.65 – 3.7 V), max 403.2 V (cell 4.2 V).

    Jaguar I-Pace has 36 battery module, each with 12 cells in series = 432 cells. The battery pack uses 4 modules parallel, so stack is 108 cells in series (= 432 / 4), called 108S4P battery = nominal 394.2 – 399.6 V, max 453.6 V. Audi E-tron has same high voltage like I-Pace.

    The higher battery voltage means somewhat faster charging (kW) with less current which result in less waste heat and less losses. It is a good design.

    CCS 400 V DC chargers (EVSE) can actually scale to somewhere shy of 500 V, the exact limit depend on EVSE brand. Similar 800 V DC EVSE can actually go to somewhere below 1000 V.

    In order to make the current flow into the battery the EVSE must be able to set voltage higher than battery voltage. So the ~450 V battery is about the highest possible to fit the normal CCS ~400 V EVSE standard.

  6. Michal Setlak

    Very interesting graphs. They prove that Niro and Kona use virtually the same technology (hardware AND software), and that Jaguar has still much to do, and that the Koreans have some homework to do in terms of charging. It would be very interesting to see if Porsche (and perhaps Audi) will be able to take advantage of the potential of 350 kW chargers.

  7. Foersom

    Very good video with practical charging use.

    Most EVs (e.g. BMW I3, Renault Zoe, Tesla S 100) have 96 Li-Ion cells in series = nominal 350.4 – 355.2 V (cell 3.65 – 3.7 V), max 403.2 V (cell 4.2 V).

    Jaguar I-Pace has 36 battery module, each with 12 cells in series = 432 cells. The battery pack uses 4 modules parallel, so stack is 108 cells in series (= 432 / 4), known as 108S4P battery = nominal 394.2 – 399.6 V, max 453.6 V. Audi E-tron also has same high voltage like I-Pace.

    The higher battery voltage means somewhat faster charging (kW) with less current (Ampere), which gives less heat problems and less losses. It is good idea!

    CCS 400 V DC chargers (EVSE) can actually scale to somewhere shy of 500 V, the exact limit depend on EVSE brand. Similar 800 V DC EVSE can actually go to somewhere below 1000 V.

    In order to make the current flow into the battery the EVSE must be able to set voltage higher than battery voltage. So the ~450 V battery is about the highest possible to fit the normal CCS ~400 V EVSE standard.

  8. Dave Barnes

    It's all about Ohms law.. just like the grid transports power across the country.. energy is converted (transformed) to say 40,000v with very low amperage thus reducing the 'heating effect of the current (amps)'.
    Sub stations then convert the energy back to lower voltage and higher amps for local use. By doing this cables are not melted like a wire fuse would be.
    So… in the case of i-pace 'higher voltage = lower amps and therefore less heat'. Good video mate.

  9. Mathiasthorp

    So what I don't get is how can the Niro EV be sooo much more efficient than the Jag? I mean it's bulky and quite big, unlike the Jag that's got multiple "aero features". Just the grill and lights that differ from the Niro PHEV. The car is way taller and I would expect has more surface area. Can weight alone be the crucial factor?

  10. FutureSystem738

    Efficiency in an EV is everything, and the iPace doesn’t win that critical milestone. Who cares if it charges fairly fast if it then uses a lot per kilometre! At higher speed aerodynamics is king: the iPace compared to say a Model 3, just doesn’t cut it and would be much worse the faster you go. The silly big ICE style grille should have been tackled by the design team, perhaps even with a “blank” like the Kia Niro, but of course that would have made it less attractive to many people. (It would be interesting to see how efficient the iPace is at low speed. Is it JUST poor aerodynamics or is it inefficient inverters/motors as well??)
    The Model 3 front end has perfect aerodynamics, (as does the rear!) with the blunt nose not unlike the nose of many aircraft. A few people have criticised it’s look, but once you get used to it, it’s a thing of beauty! (They look better “in the flesh” than in photos.) Combine that with the beautiful simplicity of the user friendly interior and user interface, and it’s a winner for me.
    (Although it seems like a fairly good effort for a first try by Jaguar, I’m afraid the iPace is off my shopping list.)

  11. Martin Björemo

    Can you make graphs where you have time on X axel instead of battery percentage. Would me even more interesting. Sure, when lines will end on different places, but that is part of what I want to see. Thanks, great videos!

  12. News Coulomb

    Is the Ionity charger limited to 200 A?

    The I-PACE battery has higher voltages because it uses 108 cells in series as opposed to 96 cells in series that most car batteries use. Also, the I-PACE uses heat exchangers on the power electronics. If you have the climate on in anyway, it's probably transferring the heat to the cabin without outside fans.

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